GTFO: Malaysian investors want Cardiff City FC to rebrand and play in red

GTFO: Malaysian investors want Cardiff City FC to rebrand and play in red

I’ve come to expect all sorts of stupidity in the name of filthy cash when it comes to the modern game of football, but rarely have I seen anything as utterly idiotic as what’s being proposed for my beloved Cardiff City FC.

According to a BBC report, Cardiff City are considering a rebrand from blue to red in exchange for a ton of cash from their Malaysian investors.

Apparently red is seen as a “more dynamic colour for marketing in Asia,” so the club is considering changing both its  shirts and club badge.

May I publicly invite Cardiff City to consider this move very, very carefully indeed because there’s going to be fucking uproar if they change the team’s colours.

Leave it alone. Fuck marketing. I’d rather see us in Division Four than be at the whim of any passing swivel-action marketing expert who thinks he knows what’s best for the club.

We do not want to play in fucking red – and you can expect one hell of a kick back if you try and force this on your loyal fans.

UPDATE 1: Sign the petition here

UPDATE 2: The Supporters’ Trust have outlined the proposals:

Trust chair Tim Hartley, vice-chair Tracey Marsh and board member Keith Morgan tonight attended a meeting with other fans’ representatives.

At that meeting Alan Whiteley, chief executive of Cardiff City, explained proposals by Malaysian owner Vincent Tan to invest around £100m in the club.

The investment will improve the stadium, will build new training facilities and offer Malky Mackay money to strengthen the team. The plans would see the stadium expanded to 35,000 seats by 2014.

However, Mr Whiteley said that the investment comes as part of a package with conditions:

  • From next season Cardiff City will play in red shirts, black shorts and red socks with a blue away kit.
  • The Bluebirds badge will be changed to that of a dragon.
  • But the name will remain as Cardiff City Football Club.

Vincent Tan and the Malaysian investors want the colour and badge changed to represent the fusion of the two cultures of Wales and Malaysia. This, Mr Whiteley, said would lead to new commercial and retail opportunities in Asia.